The Crown returns on Nov 17 with a new queen

first_img Share your voice TV and Movies Originally published Aug. 12, 7:21 a.m. PT.Update, 11:03 a.m.: Adds more background on The Crown. Olivia Colman and Tobias Menzies will play Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip in the upcoming season of The Crown. Sophie Mutevelian/Netflix The Crown is coming back to Netflix, but this time with a new queen. Netflix on Monday revealed that season 3 of the series will return on Nov. 17. This will be the first season with Academy Award winner Olivia Colman taking on the role of Queen Elizabeth II. Netflix also released a short teaser video showing Colman as the queen. She’s dressed in an evening gown with a royal blue sash and crown, along with a serious look on her face. Colman told Vanity Fair last November that it’s been a challenge to summon Queen Elizabeth’s steely stoicism.  Post a comment Tags The third season of the historical drama will feature an all-new cast in the lead roles. Colman takes over for Claire Foy, who won an Emmy for her portrayal of Queen Elizabeth, while Tobias Menzies steps in for Matt Smith as Prince Philip and Helena Bonham Carter takes over for Vanessa Kirby as Princess Margaret.The third season of The Crown will span the years 1964 to 1977, according to Netflix. This time period covers royal family events like Prince Charles’ coronation as the Prince of Wales, as well as cultural moments like Winston Churchill’s funeral and Beatlemania.Season 1 and 2 of The Crown are available to stream now on Netflix. center_img 0 2:31 What’s new to stream in August 2019 Now playing: Watch this: Netflixlast_img read more

BCL activist hacked dead in Jessore

first_imgA local activist of Bangladesh Chhatra League (BCL) was stabbed to death by a group of miscreants at Katakhal village in Jessore’s Jhikargachha upazila on Saturday afternoon, reports UNB.The deceased was identified as Milon Hossain, 26, son of late Alamgir Hossain of the village.Officer-in-charge of Jhikargachha police station Abu Saleh Masud Karim said a group of miscreants waylaid Milon when he was returning home from Jhikargachha Bazar after attending a party meeting and stabbed him mercilessly around 1:40pm, leaving the BCL activist injured.He was taken to Jhikargachha Upazila Health Complex.Later, Milon died while being shifted to Jessore Medical College Hospital, said the OC adding the miscreants might have killed the BCL man over previous enmity.last_img read more

The Couple Killed Saving Their Baby In El Paso Had Just Found

first_img Share Courtesy of Tito AnchondoA photo shows Jordan Anchondo (left) and her husband, Andre Anchondo, with two of their children. The couple died last weekend when a gunman stormed a Walmart in El Paso, killing at least 22 people.Andre and Jordan Anchondo were expecting houseguests for a barbecue last Saturday. It was supposed to be a triple celebration. Andre had just finished building their new home, the couple was celebrating their first wedding anniversary and their daughter was turning 6.Before the barbecue, they dropped by Walmart to grab school supplies and food for the party. But all of their plans and celebrations shattered in an instant of violence.A man with a gun entered the store and opened fire, killing the Anchondos and at least 20 others in an attack federal prosecutors are treating as domestic terrorism and a potential hate crime.Andre Anchondo died protecting Jordan; she died shielding their 2-month-old baby, Paul, who was grazed by a bullet but survived the shooting.As President Trump headed to El Paso on Wednesday and the grieving communities held vigils to mourn the dead, Andre’s older brother and father were back at work in the family’s auto shop, figuring out how to press on.“It’s gonna be rough without my brother being there,” Tito Anchondo told NPR. “We just have to keep moving forward, and that’s the reason we’re open right now because the bills don’t stop and we have jobs here that still need to be finished.”As the country responds and his community reacts to the tragedy, Tito is watching his own family mourn. “My dad is very Mexican macho. He doesn’t like to show emotion. I’m sure he’s cried by himself,” he said. His mother is inconsolable and “just in tears all the time.”Tito said one way he has decided to deal with the loss is to talk about his brother and tell his story. “My brother always looked up to me, but one thing that he never knew was that I looked up to him …,” Tito said. “That’s why I like talking about him a lot because he meant so much to me. I tried to be like him even if he didn’t know that.”Andre started his own shop installing granite countertops and renovating kitchens while Jordan stayed at home to care for their three children. Jordan had two of the children from earlier relationships. Paul, the Anchondos’ first child together, was born in May.“It takes a special kind of person, also, to adopt other children that aren’t yours,” Tito said. “But he was a great brother, a great son, a great husband. Jordan as well was a great wife. She helped him stay strong.”Leta Jamrowski, Jordan’s sister, remembers her as a hero.“[Paul] pretty much lived because she gave her life,” Jamrowski told The Associated Press.Tito says he would like to take Paul in. The grieving brother feels a responsibility to look after the baby and needs “to tell him that his father died a hero saving his life.”On Wednesday, President Trump visited El Paso and Dayton, Ohio, to meet with survivors of the weekend massacres. Though the president has been met by protesters, some of whom think he helped incite the violence in El Paso with his language about immigrants, Tito sees it differently.“I can see why people would believe that,” Tito says. “And yes, maybe he said things in bad taste. But I think people are misconstruing President Trump’s ideas.”Tito Anchondo says his family has always been Republican conservatives. “My brother was very supportive of Trump,” he said, adding that he would like to sit down with the president and tell him about their pain.“I want to see his reaction in person,” he said. “I want to see if he’s genuine and see if my political views are right or wrong. And see if he feels maybe some kind of remorse for statements that he’s made. I just want to have a human-to-human talk with him and see how he feels.”This story was produced and edited by Danny Hajek and Taylor Haney with assistance from Matt Kwong. Josh Axelrod is an NPR Digital Content intern.Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more

TF1 Group Joins Moviechainers Client Roster to Keep Track of Revenue Shares

first_img Popular on Variety CBS Studios Intl. Sets Multi-Series Agreement With France’s TF1 Group After enrolling MK2 last year, Moviechainer, the cloud-based app allowing right-holders to model and track the legal and financial structure of their film projects, has added TF1 Group, Europe’s leading private broadcaster, to its client portfolio.MovieChainer, which was launched in 2014 by the Paris-based film company Backup (“Arctic,” “Donnybrook”), is already been used by companies such as MK2, Bankside Films, Memento International, Charades, as well as Superights, Fintage and Endemol Shine. The app improves filmmakers, producers, sales agents and distributors’ ability to perform quick and accurate revenue simulations and keep track of their revenue shares throughout the commercial life of their films.Within the last few years, TF1 Group has indeed created a solid TV channels offering, clustered around TF1, and is now involved in the production and distribution of content across all platforms. Moviechainer will work along with the broadcaster’s production/distribution arm TF1 Studio’s team in their overall processes, including rights acquisition, coproduction and distribution, as well as the liaison with all rights holders. MK2 Rolls Out Documentary Slate With Jia Zhang-ke’s ‘So Close to My Land’ (EXCLUSIVE) “With a catalogue composed of several thousand titles, from film classics to TV series and reality-shows, TF1 Studio faces all major challenges of our industry: growth of the VOD and SVOD market, shorter and more numerous sales cycles. Now more than ever, studios have to adapt to the ever changing practices of our industry,” said Philippine Roy, sales manager for Moviechainer. Roy said “Moviechainer offers an evolutive and secure solution, that is both centralised and connected, allowing our clients to optimise their businesses and keep track of the exploitation of their rights, their availabilities, and manage their receipts and their allocations.”Chhuy Te-Hoang, project owner on behalf of TF1 Studio, said the company was looking for a “flexible and progressive solution” that would “work across (the company’s) different trades in the development, coproduction and distribution of multi-licence content, including theatrical, e-cinema, video, VOD with MYTF1VOD, SVOD with TFOU MAX, as well as international and French TV sales. She said “Moviechainer has emerged as the best solution for both these issues.” Related ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15last_img read more

Thermodynamics of visual images may help us see the world

first_img Explore further More information: Greg J. Stephens, et al. “Statistical Thermodynamics of Natural Images.” PRL 110, 018701 (2013). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.018701 (a) A grayscale image of a forest. Photo by Dan Ruderman. (b) The same image after it is quantized into two equally populated levels of black and white. The researchers found that small patches within this quantized image retain substantial local structure. This finding led them to discover that the photo is scale-invariant—its structure stays the same as its scale changes. Credit: Greg J. Stephens, et al. ©2013 American Physical Society (a) 4 x 4 patches from the quantized forest image with the lowest energy states, starting with the lowest energy states of all: solid black and white blocks. The other patches are local minima, and many of them can be interpreted as lines and edges. The scientists speculate that the visual system might build neurons that identify these local minima in order to build a representation of the world. In part (b), the researchers computed the average light-intensity images that correspond to those in part (a). These average images resemble those that trigger neuron responses in the primary visual cortex. Credit: Greg J. Stephens, et al. ©2013 American Physical Society This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Copyright 2013 Phys.org All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of Phys.org. The scientists saw this scale invariance as a hint that natural images may have something in common with a physical system at a critical point. In physical systems, scale invariance emerges only when the temperature reaches a critical value, at which point a phase transition occurs between two phases characterized by different forms of order.To examine whether the ensemble of natural images has its own critical point, the researchers treated the distribution of pixels as the Boltzmann distribution for a physical system, where the patterns of pixels in the small patches are associated with different energy levels according to their probability. Remarkably, as the patch size increased so too did a peak in the specific heat, a thermodynamic variable that characterizes fluctuations in the energy of the ensemble. These results suggest a sharp transition in the thermodynamic limit of large patch sizes, similar to how a physical system reaches this limit at a critical temperature.The researchers found that this approach to the thermodynamics of images also shares similarities with Zipf-like distributions. According to Zipf’s law, elements in a group (for example, words in a book) that are sorted from most common to least common will follow a pattern where the second most common element is 1/2 as common as the first, the third most common element is 1/3 as common as the first, etc. Zipf-like distributions have been found to hold for many different situations, and here the scientists found that they also closely describe the distribution of the size of pixel patches ranked by the structure as determined by their black and white pixels.Perhaps the most interesting implication of viewing natural images from a thermodynamics perspective is what it reveals about the nature of image patches that correspond to the low energy states. The patches with the absolute lowest energy states are those that are either all black or all white. However, a small number of patches have pixels in both states yet are considered local minima, since flipping any single pixel would increase the energy. Looking closer at these patches, the researchers found that many of them have distinct patterns, such as edges between dark and light regions.The researchers speculate that the importance of these local minima in natural images may help us and other creatures “see” our surroundings, even when our eyes don’t absorb every pixel. The visual system may build neurons that are tuned to these “basins of attraction.” In other words, these low-energy patches may assist the brain in filling in the details using some kind of error-correcting code based on the thermodynamics of the visual world. A team of researchers at Princeton University has taken a closer look at images of nature and proposed that the scale invariance of images closely resembles the thermodynamics of physical systems at a critical point, with the distribution of pixels in the images analogous to the distribution of particle states in a physical system such as a ferromagnet. The parts of an image that correspond to the low-energy states, or local minima, have surprisingly interpretable structure, and these thermodynamic characteristics may help the brain see.The researchers, Greg J. Stephens, Thierry Mora, Gašper Tkačik, and William Bialek, at Princeton University, have published their study on the thermodynamics of images in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters.In their study, the scientists analyzed an ensemble of photographs taken in a forest at Hacklebarney State Park in New Jersey. The researchers converted the grayscale camera images to binary (black and white) images. Although intensity information was lost in the quantization, many details such as the structure of the trees and a body of water could still be identified. The worlds smallest 3D HD display Journal information: Physical Review Letters The researchers then divided each binary image into much smaller patches composed of 3 x 3 and 4 x 4 pixels and examined the distribution of black and white pixels in these patches. To quantify how much structure is present in these tiny segments of natural images, the researchers measured the entropy of the distribution of pixels. Randomly distributed pixels would give an entropy level of 9 and 16 bits, respectively, for the 3 x 3 and 4 x 4 pixel regions. But the researchers found that the entropy levels of the same-sized regions from the photo were only 6.5 and 11.2 bits, suggesting that substantial local structure remains in the tiny patches.To explore how local image structure changes with scale, the researchers averaged neighboring pixels within each image and repeated their patch analysis. After such “coarse-graining,” the image had lower resolution, but remarkably both the entropy and pixel distribution were unchanged from the original image. Even after repeating this coarse-graining process four times, the pixel distributions in the small square regions remained the same, indicating that the photo is scale-invariant—its structure stays the same as its scale changes. Citation: Thermodynamics of visual images may help us see the world (2013, February 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-02-thermodynamics-visual-images-world.html (Phys.org)—Although researchers know that a large portion of the brain is devoted to visual processing, exactly how we interpret the complex patterns within natural scenes is far from understood. One question scientists ask is, is there something about the structure of the visual world itself that enables our brains to process and understand our visual surroundings, and is this structure something that can be described quantitatively?last_img read more