NOW HIRING 10 New Job Openings In Wilmington

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are some of the newest job openings in Wilmington:Full-Time Purchasing Manager at Koch ChemicalFull-Time Payroll Supervisor at UniFirstFull-Time Activities Coordinator at Windsor PlaceFull-Time Delivery Driver at J. Polep Distribution ServicesPart-Time Caregiver at Assisting Hands of WilmingtonPart-Time Package Handler at UPSFull-Time Senior Systems Engineer at MKS InstrumentsPart-Time General Labor at Pepsi Co.Full-Time Warehouse Sort Supervisor at OptimaFull-Time Client Development Manager at Serur Agencies(NOTE: Wilmington businesses — Feel free to send me your job postings at wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedNOW HIRING: 10 New Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”NOW HIRING: 10 Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”NOW HIRING: 10 New Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”last_img read more

The Couple Killed Saving Their Baby In El Paso Had Just Found

first_img Share Courtesy of Tito AnchondoA photo shows Jordan Anchondo (left) and her husband, Andre Anchondo, with two of their children. The couple died last weekend when a gunman stormed a Walmart in El Paso, killing at least 22 people.Andre and Jordan Anchondo were expecting houseguests for a barbecue last Saturday. It was supposed to be a triple celebration. Andre had just finished building their new home, the couple was celebrating their first wedding anniversary and their daughter was turning 6.Before the barbecue, they dropped by Walmart to grab school supplies and food for the party. But all of their plans and celebrations shattered in an instant of violence.A man with a gun entered the store and opened fire, killing the Anchondos and at least 20 others in an attack federal prosecutors are treating as domestic terrorism and a potential hate crime.Andre Anchondo died protecting Jordan; she died shielding their 2-month-old baby, Paul, who was grazed by a bullet but survived the shooting.As President Trump headed to El Paso on Wednesday and the grieving communities held vigils to mourn the dead, Andre’s older brother and father were back at work in the family’s auto shop, figuring out how to press on.“It’s gonna be rough without my brother being there,” Tito Anchondo told NPR. “We just have to keep moving forward, and that’s the reason we’re open right now because the bills don’t stop and we have jobs here that still need to be finished.”As the country responds and his community reacts to the tragedy, Tito is watching his own family mourn. “My dad is very Mexican macho. He doesn’t like to show emotion. I’m sure he’s cried by himself,” he said. His mother is inconsolable and “just in tears all the time.”Tito said one way he has decided to deal with the loss is to talk about his brother and tell his story. “My brother always looked up to me, but one thing that he never knew was that I looked up to him …,” Tito said. “That’s why I like talking about him a lot because he meant so much to me. I tried to be like him even if he didn’t know that.”Andre started his own shop installing granite countertops and renovating kitchens while Jordan stayed at home to care for their three children. Jordan had two of the children from earlier relationships. Paul, the Anchondos’ first child together, was born in May.“It takes a special kind of person, also, to adopt other children that aren’t yours,” Tito said. “But he was a great brother, a great son, a great husband. Jordan as well was a great wife. She helped him stay strong.”Leta Jamrowski, Jordan’s sister, remembers her as a hero.“[Paul] pretty much lived because she gave her life,” Jamrowski told The Associated Press.Tito says he would like to take Paul in. The grieving brother feels a responsibility to look after the baby and needs “to tell him that his father died a hero saving his life.”On Wednesday, President Trump visited El Paso and Dayton, Ohio, to meet with survivors of the weekend massacres. Though the president has been met by protesters, some of whom think he helped incite the violence in El Paso with his language about immigrants, Tito sees it differently.“I can see why people would believe that,” Tito says. “And yes, maybe he said things in bad taste. But I think people are misconstruing President Trump’s ideas.”Tito Anchondo says his family has always been Republican conservatives. “My brother was very supportive of Trump,” he said, adding that he would like to sit down with the president and tell him about their pain.“I want to see his reaction in person,” he said. “I want to see if he’s genuine and see if my political views are right or wrong. And see if he feels maybe some kind of remorse for statements that he’s made. I just want to have a human-to-human talk with him and see how he feels.”This story was produced and edited by Danny Hajek and Taylor Haney with assistance from Matt Kwong. Josh Axelrod is an NPR Digital Content intern.Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more

Hulu Promotes Brittany Hveem to Head of Business Affairs

first_imgHulu has elevated Brittany Hveem to the role of head of business affairs, where she leads business affairs for all development and production deals related to originals and will manage all aspects of business affairs strategy, policy and procedure.Hveem previously was business affairs director at Hulu, which she joined two years ago. She continues to report to Chadwick Ho, senior VP and general counsel.Hulu’s previous head of business affairs, Philip Matthys, left the company late last year to join Apple’s Worldwide Video team in a similar role.At Hulu, Hveem most recently oversaw efforts for original series orders including: “Looking for Alaska,” a drama series based on the bestselling John Green novel from Paramount Television and Josh Schwartz and Stephanie Savage’s Fake Empire; “Four Weddings and a Funeral,” a limited series written and executive produced by Mindy Kaling and Matt Warburton, inspired by the 1994 British romantic comedy film; “Ramy,” a comedy series based on the real-life experiences of Ramy Youssef; and “Little Fires Everywhere” from Reese Witherspoon and Kerry Washington based on the novel of the same name. In addition to overseeing business affairs for originals, Hveem manages the business and production relationships with studio suppliers such as Warner Bros., Universal Television, Sony and Lionsgate to approve production budgets and negotiations with talent.Prior to joining Hulu in 2016, Hveem was VP of business affairs for Warner Horizon Television and before that was counsel at ABC Studios. She holds a B.A. in English from UCLA and received her law degree from Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. Popular on Variety center_img ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15last_img read more

Thermodynamics of visual images may help us see the world

first_img Explore further More information: Greg J. Stephens, et al. “Statistical Thermodynamics of Natural Images.” PRL 110, 018701 (2013). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.018701 (a) A grayscale image of a forest. Photo by Dan Ruderman. (b) The same image after it is quantized into two equally populated levels of black and white. The researchers found that small patches within this quantized image retain substantial local structure. This finding led them to discover that the photo is scale-invariant—its structure stays the same as its scale changes. Credit: Greg J. Stephens, et al. ©2013 American Physical Society (a) 4 x 4 patches from the quantized forest image with the lowest energy states, starting with the lowest energy states of all: solid black and white blocks. The other patches are local minima, and many of them can be interpreted as lines and edges. The scientists speculate that the visual system might build neurons that identify these local minima in order to build a representation of the world. In part (b), the researchers computed the average light-intensity images that correspond to those in part (a). These average images resemble those that trigger neuron responses in the primary visual cortex. Credit: Greg J. Stephens, et al. ©2013 American Physical Society This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Copyright 2013 Phys.org All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of Phys.org. The scientists saw this scale invariance as a hint that natural images may have something in common with a physical system at a critical point. In physical systems, scale invariance emerges only when the temperature reaches a critical value, at which point a phase transition occurs between two phases characterized by different forms of order.To examine whether the ensemble of natural images has its own critical point, the researchers treated the distribution of pixels as the Boltzmann distribution for a physical system, where the patterns of pixels in the small patches are associated with different energy levels according to their probability. Remarkably, as the patch size increased so too did a peak in the specific heat, a thermodynamic variable that characterizes fluctuations in the energy of the ensemble. These results suggest a sharp transition in the thermodynamic limit of large patch sizes, similar to how a physical system reaches this limit at a critical temperature.The researchers found that this approach to the thermodynamics of images also shares similarities with Zipf-like distributions. According to Zipf’s law, elements in a group (for example, words in a book) that are sorted from most common to least common will follow a pattern where the second most common element is 1/2 as common as the first, the third most common element is 1/3 as common as the first, etc. Zipf-like distributions have been found to hold for many different situations, and here the scientists found that they also closely describe the distribution of the size of pixel patches ranked by the structure as determined by their black and white pixels.Perhaps the most interesting implication of viewing natural images from a thermodynamics perspective is what it reveals about the nature of image patches that correspond to the low energy states. The patches with the absolute lowest energy states are those that are either all black or all white. However, a small number of patches have pixels in both states yet are considered local minima, since flipping any single pixel would increase the energy. Looking closer at these patches, the researchers found that many of them have distinct patterns, such as edges between dark and light regions.The researchers speculate that the importance of these local minima in natural images may help us and other creatures “see” our surroundings, even when our eyes don’t absorb every pixel. The visual system may build neurons that are tuned to these “basins of attraction.” In other words, these low-energy patches may assist the brain in filling in the details using some kind of error-correcting code based on the thermodynamics of the visual world. A team of researchers at Princeton University has taken a closer look at images of nature and proposed that the scale invariance of images closely resembles the thermodynamics of physical systems at a critical point, with the distribution of pixels in the images analogous to the distribution of particle states in a physical system such as a ferromagnet. The parts of an image that correspond to the low-energy states, or local minima, have surprisingly interpretable structure, and these thermodynamic characteristics may help the brain see.The researchers, Greg J. Stephens, Thierry Mora, Gašper Tkačik, and William Bialek, at Princeton University, have published their study on the thermodynamics of images in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters.In their study, the scientists analyzed an ensemble of photographs taken in a forest at Hacklebarney State Park in New Jersey. The researchers converted the grayscale camera images to binary (black and white) images. Although intensity information was lost in the quantization, many details such as the structure of the trees and a body of water could still be identified. The worlds smallest 3D HD display Journal information: Physical Review Letters The researchers then divided each binary image into much smaller patches composed of 3 x 3 and 4 x 4 pixels and examined the distribution of black and white pixels in these patches. To quantify how much structure is present in these tiny segments of natural images, the researchers measured the entropy of the distribution of pixels. Randomly distributed pixels would give an entropy level of 9 and 16 bits, respectively, for the 3 x 3 and 4 x 4 pixel regions. But the researchers found that the entropy levels of the same-sized regions from the photo were only 6.5 and 11.2 bits, suggesting that substantial local structure remains in the tiny patches.To explore how local image structure changes with scale, the researchers averaged neighboring pixels within each image and repeated their patch analysis. After such “coarse-graining,” the image had lower resolution, but remarkably both the entropy and pixel distribution were unchanged from the original image. Even after repeating this coarse-graining process four times, the pixel distributions in the small square regions remained the same, indicating that the photo is scale-invariant—its structure stays the same as its scale changes. Citation: Thermodynamics of visual images may help us see the world (2013, February 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-02-thermodynamics-visual-images-world.html (Phys.org)—Although researchers know that a large portion of the brain is devoted to visual processing, exactly how we interpret the complex patterns within natural scenes is far from understood. One question scientists ask is, is there something about the structure of the visual world itself that enables our brains to process and understand our visual surroundings, and is this structure something that can be described quantitatively?last_img read more

Scientists harvest energy from beams selfinduced selfsustaining vibrations in airflow

first_imgThe energy harvester consists of a carbon fiber beam with a piezoelectric sensor and stepper motor to adjust the angle of attack of the airflow in the wind tunnel. Unlike previous designs, the system does not require a secondary vibrating structure because the beam itself vibrates, reducing the volume of the harvester and increasing its efficiency. Credit: Zakaria, et al. ©2015 AIP Publishing UK scientists develop optimum piezoelectric energy harvesters Citation: Scientists harvest energy from beam’s self-induced, self-sustaining vibrations in airflow (2015, July 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-07-scientists-harvest-energy-self-induced-self-sustaining.html More information: Mohamed Y. Zakaria, et al. “Experimental analysis of energy harvesting from self-induced flutter of a composite beam.” Applied Physics Letters. DOI: 10.1063/1.4926876 Journal information: Applied Physics Letters © 2015 Phys.orgcenter_img The researchers, Mohamed Y. Zakaria, Mohammad Y. Al-Haik, and Muhammad R. Hajj from the Center for Energy Harvesting Materials and Systems at Virginia Tech, have published a paper on the new energy-harvesting method in a recent issue of Applied Physics Letters.”The greatest significance of the work is the reduction of the volume of the harvester, which translates to an increase in the power density, by eliminating the need for a secondary structure to be attached to the beam,” Zakaria said. “This reduction is important in the design of very small harvesters that can be used to develop self-powered sensors.”The research shows that subjecting a flexible beam to wind at the right angle of attack can cause the beam to bend so much that the beam’s “flutter speed” is significantly reduced. A large degree of bending also induces a change in the beam’s natural frequencies that basically results in a synchronization of the beam’s bending and twisting frequencies. Specifically, the beam’s second bending frequency and torsional frequency coalesce, resulting in “self-induced flutter” of the beam. Complex aerodynamic effects ensure that the vibrations are self-sustaining, allowing for continuous energy harvesting.The researchers demonstrated the design using a flexible cantilever beam with a piezoelectric transducer, which they hung from the ceiling in a wind tunnel. They found that the amount of energy harvested depends on a combination of factors, including the wind speed and the angle at which the wind hits the beam. At a wind speed of 10 m/s and 5.4° angle, the method can harvest approximately 0.3 mW of power. Although the researchers plan to improve the power levels, even this small value can be used to power individual sensors, which, as Zakaria explained, have a wide variety of applications.”Future monitoring of different systems and platforms such as air and water systems, structures, vehicles, infrastructure, etc., as well as secure data transmission and reception from these sensors, will require the use of hundreds or thousands of sensors, data loggers and hardware components,” Zakaria said. “The ability to integrate energy harvesters within these sensors or data loggers to develop such self-powered instruments is very much needed to enable their use without the need to replace batteries on a regular basis.”In the future, the researchers plan to design even smaller beams with specific geometries and capabilities, as well as to improve the performance of the piezoelectric elements. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org)—In an attempt to harvest the kinetic energy of airflow, researchers have demonstrated the ability to harvest energy directly from the vibrations of a flexible, piezoelectric beam placed in a wind tunnel. While the general approach to harvesting energy from these “aeroelastic” vibrations is to attach the beam to a secondary vibrating structure, such as a wing section, the new design eliminates the need for the secondary vibrating structure because the beam is designed so that it produces self-induced and self-sustaining vibrations. As a result, the new system can be made very small, which increases its efficiency and makes it more practical for applications, such as self-powered sensors. Explore furtherlast_img read more

Increased floodlighting reducing bat populations in Swedens churches

first_img Bats in Sweden are generally welcomed because they eat destructive insects and tend to hide at night. But bats have a unique history in the country, as well, because Sweden does not have many caves—instead, most of the bats live in the warm towers and belfries of rural churches. But, the researchers suggest, a recent lighting trend has put the bats at risk, and their numbers are falling.Rydell has been interested in bats for many years—back in the 1980s, he conducted surveys of specimens living in 61 churches in southwest Sweden, making population charts. In this new effort, he and his colleagues revisited those churches along with 50 others, counting the number of brown long-eared bats.The researchers concluded that bat populations had remained stable in churches that lacked floodlighting. But in churches with such lighting, populations dwindled depending on how much lighting had been installed. In churches where floodlights were installed on all four sides of a building, there were no bats left at all.Installing floodlights, the researchers note, became popular over the past few decades as church staff sought to show off the unique architecture at night. The contrast of the usually stark white buildings lit against a deep black sky offers an inspiring visage, but, it also makes resident bats much more vulnerable to predation by owls, hawks and cats.The researchers note that bats are protected in Sweden—it is against the law to harm them, or even to disturb them. They suggest it is likely that most of the people involved in installing church lighting do not know that their efforts have caused problems for the bats. They suggest a partial solution—instead of installing lighting all the way around a church, leaving at least one side dark, preferably the side closest to trees. The bats will adjust and only roost on that side. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org)—A trio of researchers, two from Sweden and one from Spain has found that installing floodlighting around rural churches drives away roosting bats. In their paper published in Royal Society Open Science, Jens Rydell, with Lund University, Johan Eklöf, with Graptolit Ord och Natur and Sonia Sánchez-Navarro with Estación Biológica de Doñana-CSIC describe their comparison of church bat populations over the course of several decades. Winging it: How do bats out-maneuver their prey? Explore further Journal information: Royal Society Open Sciencecenter_img Citation: Increased floodlighting reducing bat populations in Sweden’s churches (2017, August 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-08-floodlighting-populations-sweden-churches.html Credit: CC0 Public Domain More information: Jens Rydell et al. Age of enlightenment: long-term effects of outdoor aesthetic lights on bats in churches, Royal Society Open Science (2017). DOI: 10.1098/rsos.161077AbstractWe surveyed 110 country churches in south-western Sweden for presence of brown long-eared bats Plecotus auritus in summer 2016 by visual inspection and/or evening emergence counts. Each church was also classified according to the presence and amount of aesthetic directional lights (flood-lights) aimed on its walls and tower from the outside. Sixty-one of the churches had previously been surveyed by one of us (J.R.) between 1980 and 1990, before lights were installed on Swedish churches, using the same methods. Churches with bat colonies had decreased significantly in frequency from 61% in 1980s to 38% by 2016. All abandoned churches had been fitted with flood-lights in the period between the two surveys. The loss of bat colonies from lit churches was highly significant and most obvious when lights were applied from all directions, leaving no dark corridor for the bats to leave and return to the roost. In contrast, in churches that were not lit, all of 13 bat colonies remained after 25+ years between the surveys. Lighting of churches and other historical buildings is a serious threat to the long-term survival and reproduction of light-averse bats such as Plecotus spp. and other slow-flying species. Bat roosts are strictly protected according to the EU Habitats Directive and the EUROBATS agreement. Lighting of buildings for aesthetic purposes is becoming a serious environmental issue, because important bat roosts are destroyed in large numbers, and the problem should be handled accordingly. As a start, installation of flood-lights on historical buildings should at least require an environmental impact assessment (EIA). © 2017 Phys.orglast_img read more