The Crown returns on Nov 17 with a new queen

first_img Share your voice TV and Movies Originally published Aug. 12, 7:21 a.m. PT.Update, 11:03 a.m.: Adds more background on The Crown. Olivia Colman and Tobias Menzies will play Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip in the upcoming season of The Crown. Sophie Mutevelian/Netflix The Crown is coming back to Netflix, but this time with a new queen. Netflix on Monday revealed that season 3 of the series will return on Nov. 17. This will be the first season with Academy Award winner Olivia Colman taking on the role of Queen Elizabeth II. Netflix also released a short teaser video showing Colman as the queen. She’s dressed in an evening gown with a royal blue sash and crown, along with a serious look on her face. Colman told Vanity Fair last November that it’s been a challenge to summon Queen Elizabeth’s steely stoicism.  Post a comment Tags The third season of the historical drama will feature an all-new cast in the lead roles. Colman takes over for Claire Foy, who won an Emmy for her portrayal of Queen Elizabeth, while Tobias Menzies steps in for Matt Smith as Prince Philip and Helena Bonham Carter takes over for Vanessa Kirby as Princess Margaret.The third season of The Crown will span the years 1964 to 1977, according to Netflix. This time period covers royal family events like Prince Charles’ coronation as the Prince of Wales, as well as cultural moments like Winston Churchill’s funeral and Beatlemania.Season 1 and 2 of The Crown are available to stream now on Netflix. center_img 0 2:31 What’s new to stream in August 2019 Now playing: Watch this: Netflixlast_img read more

Kashmir journos frustrated by communications blockade

first_imgIndian security forces personnel patrol a deserted street during restrictions after the government scrapped special status for Kashmir, in Srinagar 9 August, 2019. Photo: ReutersKashmir has nearly 180 English and Urdu daily newspapers, but only five are publishing these days due to restrictions imposed by Indian authorities to prevent unrest after New Delhi revoked the state’s autonomy.That is frustrating for the region’s journalists, many of whom are veterans of covering a long insurgency in Jammu and Kashmir and operating under prolonged curfews.”This is the biggest story of our generation and we haven’t been able to report it,” said Faisul Yaseen, associate editor of Rising Kashmir, one of the handful of newspaper groups that is still publishing.With phone lines and internet services suspended, six newspaper editors and journalists told Reuters they have no way to access wire reports or any outside online news sources, their district correspondents, and seek comment from government officials.Only five newspapers out of 174 dailies are now publishing, according to newspaper distributor Mansoor Ahmed, and they are being distributed within a 5-km radius of Lambert Lane, the main newspaper hub of the region, because of severe restrictions on movement, he said.Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government imposed the blackout after it stripped Kashmir of its special status this week and broke up the state into two federal territories aiming to fully integrate the Muslim majority region.Officials said restrictions will slowly be lifted. The big concern is there could be large scale demonstrations against the decision to withdraw Kashmir’s special rights to frame its own laws and lifting of a ban on people from outside the region buying property.An Indian foreign ministry spokesman said there was no restriction on the press.”Nobody has been prohibited or stopped from publishing anything. Now, because of logistical constraints if they are not able to publish it is a different matter,” the spokesman said.Usually a 12-page edition, the Rising Kashmir English daily is now only bringing out four pages, much of it sourced from a few national TV news channels and four reporters who have living and working from Rising Kashmir’s office.The final layout of the paper is hand-delivered to the press on the outskirts of the city in the evening when movement restrictions in some parts are slightly relaxed.Two other Rising Kashmir newspapers – one in Urdu, another in Kashmiri – that the group publishes are suspended.Within Srinagar, reporters and photographers are finding it difficult to work without any passes to go through security checkpoints.Editors of two Urdu newspapers in Srinagar said they had ceased publication because of a lack of news sources, movement restrictions, and staff being unable to reach the newsroom.”Even in the worst of times, the press were given curfew passes,” said Morifat Qadri, executive editor of the Daily Afaaq, which usually prints 4,000 copies daily.”They don’t want that anybody covers the current situation,” he said.last_img read more

Five Years Later Houston Firefighters Still Coping With Their Deadliest Day

first_img X Today marks five years since four Houston firefighters were killed combatting a motel fire in southwest Houston. A fifth injured in the fire passed away last year from complications related to his injuries.It was the most catastrophic loss of life the fire department had ever experienced in a single incident. Just days after, thousands gathered at NRG Stadium to attend a memorial service.Today, firefighters gathered at the site of the blaze to pay their resects. Among them was Dr. Sam Buser, who was the Houston Fire Department’s staff psychologist who helped firefighters deal with the tragedy in its aftermath.Houston Matters host Craig Cohen talks with Dr. Buser about the challenges the survivors and their colleagues still face. To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Share center_img Credit: AP Photo/Houston Chronicle, Cody DuffIn this May 31, 2013 file photo, a firefighter injured while fighting a fire at the Southwest Inn in Houston is wheeled to an ambulance. (AP Photo) Listen 00:00 /05:32last_img read more