Deadpool Writers Were on Set Because Ryan Reynolds Paid Them When Fox

first_imgAdvertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment When it was time to shoot Deadpool, 20th Century Fox wouldn’t pay writers Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick to be on set. It was important to star Ryan Reynolds that the creative team was present during shooting, so he paid them himself.In an interview on AMC’s Geeking Out (via ComicBook.com), Reese and Wernick revealed that they were on set because of Reynolds’ generosity.“We were on set every day,” they said. “Interestingly, Ryan wanted us there; we were on the project for six years. It was really a core creative team of us, Ryan, and the director Tim Miller. Fox interestingly wouldn’t pay for us to be on set. Ryan Reynolds paid out of his own money, out of his own pocket.” Advertisement Advertisementcenter_img Login/Register With: Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

What CBC Radio Gets Right

first_img Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment What it comes down to is, what is the CBC’s purpose? Whose stories is it supposed to tell? When you look at why it was created, it was meant to tell stories that reflect Canada’s regional and multicultural complexities. I’d argue that these programs do exactly that.READ MORE Facebook There is a lot to be said about the CBC.There’s a lot to be critical of, and we should be critical. But in an earlier piece written by Nick Fillmore, there is misdirected dragging of CBC Radio One’s new programming — because the kind of “human connections” programming that Fillmore takes issue with is exactly what the CBC’s mandate demands that it do.There are official and unofficial guiding policies that have moved the CBC throughout its history. The ideas that Canadians should be connected “from coast-to-coast-to-coast” and that the broadcaster should serve “everyone, every way,” are critical in understanding its extremely broad and wide-reaching mandate. Given this, it’s not surprising that some days it feels like the CBC isn’t doing anything well. Advertisement Advertisement Twitter Advertisementlast_img read more

Spotify just got sued for 2B and this Canadianowned company laid the

first_imgAdvertisement One of the reasons recording artists like Bob Dylan hire Jeff Price is because they’re not getting paid.Price is the founder of Audiam, a Canadian-owned company that collects royalties for major artists, including Dylan, Jack White, Aimee Mann, Kris Kristofferson, James Taylor and Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons.Jeff Price, founder of Audiam, says Spotify hasn’t been paying its fair share of royalties to songwriters and music publishers. (Courtesy of Audiam)Price has no qualms about going after digital streaming servicesthat millions of people use to listen to music. Advertisement Login/Register With: Twitter Advertisementcenter_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Headphones are seen in front of a logo of online music streaming service Spotify in this Feb. 18, 2014 photo. Spotify is facing a $2-billion lawsuit from artists. (Christian Hartmann/Reuters) Facebook “I was particularly frustrated by Spotify,” Price tells me on Day 6.Price says streaming services do pay royalties, but not always to the songwriters. That’s where he comes in.“I worked very very, very hard to provide Spotify all the information it needed to do what it was supposed to do over a three-year period, repeatedly sending information, and they still wouldn’t change the way they were operating.”Now his data is being used in a whopping $2-billion ($1.6-billion US) lawsuit brought against Spotify by artists like Tom Petty, Neil Young and Stevie Nicks.last_img read more

War of words erupts between CTV reporter Marci Ien Toronto police over

first_imgAdvertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: Facebook Marci Ien wrote an opinion piece in the Globe and Mail this week alleging racism played a role in her traffic stop outside her home — the third such incident, she says, in the past eight months. (COLIN MCCONNELL / TORONTO STAR FILE PHOTO) Twittercenter_img Advertisement A war of words has erupted between Toronto police and a broadcast journalist who claims she was pulled over because she is black.Marci Ien, a co-host for CTV’s The Social, wrote an opinion piece in the Globe and Mail this week alleging racism played a role in her recent traffic stop outside her home.“For the third time in eight months, I was being questioned by a police officer — and I had broken no law,” Ien wrote in the piece published on Monday. “If you are black in Canada, you are subject to a different standard and, often, seemingly, different laws.”Good morning. I wrote that the officer said I didn’t stop. If I did something wrong than I expect a ticket not special treatment. https://t.co/Mcov4iXxSa— Marci Ien (@MarciIen) February 27, 2018 Advertisement Senior Toronto police officers have since taken to social media to dispute her version of events, saying video shows Ien failed to stop at a stop sign and that her race wasn’t visible until after the officer pulled her over.last_img read more

Farmer Wants a Wife Alberta bachelor stars in Belgian reality TV show

first_imgBjorn Bonjean of Spirit Hills honey winery in Alberta is shown in in this undated handout photo. Bjorn Bonjean didn’t have trouble dating in southern Alberta — he just hadn’t found the right woman, when producers of a reality television show in Belgium came calling. The 28-year-old winemaker is one of five farmers from around the globe vying for the hearts of Belgian women in the show that echoes the long-running American dating series “The Bachelor” and its spinoffs.”Boer Zoekt Vrouw,” which translates to “Farmer Wants a Wife,” has been on the air for about 10 seasons but its latest stars bachelors in other countries who are originally from Belgium. HO / THE CANADIAN PRESS Advertisement “They roll up their sleeves, have a passion for their business, but they lack that nice Flemish woman,” says the show’s website.Filmed earlier this year, the show just started airing this week on the VTM network. Bonjean says he’s sworn to secrecy on the outcome set for November.“I can’t tell you if it ends with a proposal or not,” he says. “It’s not like ‘The Bachelor’ … The entire idea is to give the opportunity of something happening. But there’s no expectation of a proposal or even a relationship after it.”But Bonjean did reveal that he’s happy.“I’m happy with the choice that I’ve made.”Bonjean was seven when his family moved to Canada from Grobbendonk in northern Belgium. They now run Spirit Hills honey winery near Millarville, southwest of Calgary. Bonjean is head winemaker, using honey from the farm’s own beehives to create various wines and sangria.The show’s producers originally wanted both Bonjean and his sister to be part of the season, as bachelorettes have been featured in some versions of the show. But she was dating someone and didn’t speak Flemish or Dutch as well as her brother, said Bonjean.He was also dating someone at the time and turned down the offer. Months later, after a break up, he agreed to join the show.Bonjean said it’s nothing like “The Bachelor.” There are no rose ceremonies. And there’s little drama.After airing profiles of the five farmers, 1,500 women sent the show photos and letters. About 150 wanted to meet Bonjean.In the first episode, the bachelors travel to Belgium and, after putting on black eye masks, are lead into a horse riding arena and onto a stage of hay bales before a crowd of screaming women.They each meet 10 women in a speed-dating round and, after choosing five, go on an afternoon group date. They then select three to bring back to their home countries.Bonjean said it was awkward at first talking with potential partners while cameras were rolling, but he got used to it. He also used his trip to Belgium to visit with his grandmother and meet with wine importers, who agreed to market Spirit Hills in the country.“We chose Bjorn Bonjean as he’s good looking, in a good age category, and he runs a lovely, organic farm on a magical place on Earth,” the show’s story editor, Katrien Geens, said in an email.She also refused to hint at whether he finds love.“How it ends, remains a secret, until aired.”— By Chris Purdy in Edmonton Login/Register With: Advertisement Advertisementcenter_img Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook MILLARVILLE, Alta. — Bjorn Bonjean didn’t have trouble dating in southern Alberta, he just hadn’t found the right woman … then producers of a reality television show in Belgium came calling.The 28-year-old winemaker is one of five farmers from around the globe vying for the hearts of Belgian women in the show that’s similar to the long-running North American series “The Bachelor” and its spinoffs.“Boer Zoekt Vrouw,” which translates to “Farmer Wants a Wife,” has been on the air for about 10 seasons but its latest series stars bachelors in other countries who are originally from Belgium. Besides Bjorn from Canada, there’s Jitse, who runs a therapeutic care farm in Norway; Jeroen, a dairy farmer in Germany; Manu, an olive farmer in South Africa; and Jan, a cowboy in Australia.last_img read more

Dead birds fall from southern US sky experts befuddled

first_imgAPTN National NewsA mysterious case of bird deaths has wildlife officials in the U.S. southern states scratching their heads.About 3,000 red-winged blackbirds were found dead or dying in Beebe, Ark., last week. If that wasn’t bad enough, then another 500 blackbirds were found dead just over the border in Louisiana.The cause of the deaths remains unknown and wildlife officials in both states are sending bodies to the lab for study.Some have speculated that the deaths may have been caused by heart attacks, bad weather or fireworks.Last week, hundreds of thousands of drum fish washed up dead along a 20 kilometre stretch of the Arkansas River.last_img read more

Some residents of Six Nations stage a rally and walk for peace

first_imgAPTN National NewsThey called it a walk for peace, respect and friendship.The people of Six Nations marched from a park in neighbouring Caledonia to the land they reclaimed at the former Douglas Creek Estates.APTN’s Donna Smith was there and files this report.We want to warn you there is strong language in this story.last_img

Prime Minister Harper attends ceremonial closing of TRC at Rideau Hall

first_imgAPTN National NewsThis week’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission events came to a close Wednesday with special events, including a ceremony at Rideau Hall, home of the governor general.Prime Minister Stephen Harper was among those in attendance.Seven years ago, Harper apologized to victims of residential schools.APTN’s Annette Francis was at the ceremony and has this story.afrancis@aptn.calast_img

Trump confirms CNBC contributor Kudlow to be economic aide

first_imgWASHINGTON – President Donald Trump confirmed Thursday that he has picked CNBC contributor Larry Kudlow as his top economic adviser and said the country is in line for a long run of upbeat financial news.The United States “will have many years of Great Economic & Financial Success, with low taxes, unparalleled innovation, fair trade and an ever expanding labour force leading the way!” the president tweeted.Kudlow is succeeding Gary Cohn, a former Goldman Sachs executive, at the White House. Cohn is leaving after a dispute over Trump’s decision to impose tariffs on imported steel and aluminum.Kudlow served in the Reagan administration and has emerged as a leading proponent of tax cuts and a smaller government.Kudlow told The Associated Press on Wednesday that he has accepted the offer and said the U.S. economy was poised to take off after Trump signed $1.5 trillion worth of tax cuts into law.“The economy is starting to roar and we’re going to get more of that,” he said.Kudlow will join an administration in the middle of a tumultuous overhaul, with a number of White House staffers and top officials departing in recent weeks. Trump on Tuesday dumped his secretary of state, Rex Tillerson.Trump seems increasingly determined to tax foreign imports, a policy that Kudlow personally opposes. Kudlow said he is “in accord” with Trump’s agenda and that his team at the White House would help put in place policies set by the president.Trump has promised to reduce the trade imbalance with China and rewrite the North American Free Trade Agreement with Canada and Mexico. Kudlow declined to say what advice he would give the president on trade issues, saying instead that Trump is “a very good negotiator.”Kudlow, 70, has informally advised the Trump administration in the past and he has spoken with the president “at some length in recent days,” so he is ready “to hit the ground running.”Kudlow told CNBC on Wednesday that he was going to Washington on Thursday to meet with Trump. White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders said the administration “will keep everyone posted” on when Kudlow officially assumes the job.last_img read more

Price may cut back video games pitches Saturday at Toronto

first_imgNEW YORK, N.Y. – David Price considers himself a gamer — both on and off the field. Now he has to cut down on screen time.A longtime video game enthusiast, the Boston Red Sox ace was diagnosed this week with carpal tunnel syndrome. He has not pitched since May 3 but is scheduled to return Saturday at Toronto.He insists that while video games may have contributed to the condition, they’re not the origin of the swelling in his left thumb, index finger and middle finger.“This is just something that happened over time. This didn’t stem from any one thing,” the 32-year-old left-hander said Thursday. “I’m born in 1985, so that’s the video games generation. Being a Red Sox is the least amount of video games I’ve ever played being in Major League Baseball.”Winner of the 2012 AL Cy Young Award with Tampa Bay, Price is 2-4 with a 5.11 ERA in seven starts during his third season with the Red Sox after agreeing to a $215 million, seven-year contract. The five-time All-Star experienced numbness in his pitching hand during a bullpen session Sunday. He had tests Tuesday and was examined by Dr. Matthew I. Leibman in Newton, Massachusetts.Price and teammates have been spent many hours competing in the popular Fortnite, trying to fend off monsters and save the world.“I saw the Brewers were playing Fortnite on their jumbotron. This is very common. I know a lot of teams, a lot of guys, are really into it,” he said. “I’ve always played video games. I’ve always played it with my teammates, during the off-season, at the field, at the hotel. That’s kind of my generation. That’s what we do. If I need to shut down video games and pick up a new hobby, then so be it. But I do not think that’s the cause.”He added: “If that was the cause of the problem, it started back in 1997 when I got my first PlayStation when I was 12 years old.”Price threw about 40 pitches in a bullpen session Thursday and pronounced him ready to return this week. His condition will be treated with dry needles, similar to acupuncture.“Obviously it’s going to be outing by outing,” Red Sox manager Alex Cora said after watching Price throw at Yankee Stadium. “The communication has to be there. He has to be honest with us, and we will take care of him.”Price believes the injury can be controlled. He will wear a brace and will switch to his right hand for activities such as brushing his teeth.“I don’t think it’s going to go away in its entirety,” he said.Surgery would be the final option.Price was 6-3 with a 3.38 ERA in 16 games (11 starts) last year, when he was limited by an elbow injury. He said tests showed his elbow, forearm and shoulder were “pristine.”He left an April 11 start against the Yankees at Fenway Park after one inning because of a tingling sensation in his left hand, but said that was a different issue caused by a frosty night. No circulation irregularities were detected, according to the pitcher.“I still have very cold hands and very cold feet,” he said. “The lady asked if me if I could pitch with a heating glove on. And I said, ‘No, ma’am.”NOTES: If there are no postponements, RHP Steven Wright will be available Monday after serving a 15-game suspension under baseball’s domestic violence policy. Wright will be a reliever. “He’s going to be different, obviously, with the knuckleball, but we’ve got catchers that it seems like they don’t have a problem with that,” Cora said. … RHP Tyler Thornburg, coming back from surgery last June 16 to correct thoracic outlet syndrome, made his fifth minor league rehab appearance on Thursday. He gave up two runs and two hits while getting two outs for Double-A Portland. He will join the Red Sox in Toronto on Friday for a bullpen session, then return to the minors. … OF Jackie Bradley Jr. was not in the starting lineup for the second straight day but faced Cora in batting practice. Bradley is hitting .173 and said Bradley’s hands were too static and he was slowly finding a “better rhythm.” Cora isn’t sure whether Bradley will play Friday.___More AP baseball: https://apnews.com/tag/MLBbaseball__More AP baseball: https://apnews.com/tag/MLBbaseballlast_img read more

Mary Ng new federal minister tasked with getting companies to look beyond

first_imgOTTAWA – One of Canada’s newest cabinet ministers is tasked with making progress on a long-running challenge: encouraging more businesses to chase opportunities beyond the comforts of North America.Adding to the pressure, Mary Ng, named to the Trudeau cabinet in July, is taking on the role as minister of small business and export promotion at a deeply uncertain time for the critical Canada-U.S. trading relationship.Industry leaders say there is a growing urgency to help Canadian businesses find overseas markets, pointing to the unknown future of the North American Free Trade Agreement, a cross-border tariff dispute and threats by U.S. President Donald Trump of more American duties on the important automotive sector.“The U.S. is an important trading partner — they will always and continue to be an important trading partner — but looking beyond to other markets for Canadian businesses is the right thing to do and it’s an opportunity,” Ng, a Toronto-area MP who worked in the public sector for 20 years, said in an interview.“I always think it’s good to diversify.”Ng’s small business portfolio comes with an additional responsibility and title compared to her predecessor — export promotion.She is one of three federal ministers focused on trade. International Trade Diversification Minister Jim Carr and Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland, who is leading NAFTA negotiations, round out the trade trio.Ng’s focus will be spreading the word to companies about overseas markets and directing businesses to government services designed to help them take advantage of numerous trade deals Canada has struck in recent years.“(Carr)’s the one who’s going to open the door and I’m here to help our companies, our SMEs, walk through that door,” she said.The treaties include recent agreements with the Pacific Rim — known as the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership or CPTPP — and Canada’s free-trade deal with the European Union, also known as CETA.The Asia-Pacific and EU deals will open up access to a billion potential customers, but getting small businesses to explore those markets won’t be easy. Only about 11 or 12 per cent of smaller Canadian firms are currently exporting their goods or services abroad, she said.“We have a low number of SMEs that are exporting right now,” said Ng, who worked in Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s office before winning a 2017 byelection.“We need to do better.”She said she knows from her own experience that small business owners are often too busy running their day-to-day operations to figure out how to get access to a new, faraway market. Ng grew up in a small, family business and, later on in her career, said she worked with startups and small companies.Liberal and Conservative governments have made considerable efforts in recent years to get more of Canada’s small- and medium-sized companies to pursue new opportunities outside North America.For most business owners, however, the massive American market — with its proximity, familiar regulatory environment and common language — has been more than enough.Dennis Darby, president and CEO of the Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters, said uncertainty related to the country’s largest trading partnership has “magnified the need for us to look beyond the U.S.”The new trade agreements are helpful, but he recommends the government streamline access for SMEs to its current services. Even with that, patience will be needed, he said.“This is going to take a significant amount of effort, I’d say, over the next decade to really take advantage of these two big trade agreements,” Darby said, referring to the CPTPP and CETA.Dan Kelly, president and CEO of the Canadian Federation of Independent Business, said after the 2007-08 financial crisis there was a “noticeable uptick” in the number of smaller firms that pursued trade beyond the then-struggling U.S. market. The U.S. rebound, however, has led more businesses to revert back to what’s easiest — the giant market right next door.He suggests Ottawa focus on a facilitating role by helping provide fresh ideas and building up capability for firms to take advantage of trade deals like the CPTPP and CETA.But a government can only do so much, Kelly said.“There is a natural limit to export promotion and we need to be conscious of that,” he said.“Nobody starts exporting to Japan or to Lithuania because the government tells them it’s a good thing.”Kelly and Darby say they’re encouraged by the government’s decision to expand Ng’s portfolio to emphasize export promotion.Conservative MP Blake Richards, the parliamentary critic for small business, export promotion and tourism, said it’s “laudable” the government’s made export promotion clear cabinet responsibility.But he argued the federal Liberals have, at the same time, made it more difficult for small businesses to explore foreign markets because of competitiveness challenges at home — from regulations to the tax burden. Richards pointed to the federal carbon tax as an example.“It’s great to say we want to help give this opportunity to promote ourselves, but the other actions you’re seeing don’t match up with that,” Richards said.Follow @AndyBlatchford on Twitterlast_img read more

Most actively traded companies on the TSX

first_imgAurora Cannabis Inc. (TSX:ACB). Health care. Down 26 cents, or 3.64 per cent, to $6.88 on 12.5 million shares.Bombardier Inc. (TSX:BBD.B). Industrials. Up nine cents, or 4.81 per cent to $1.96 on 10.4 million shares.Kinross Gold Corp. (TSX:K). Gold. Up 35 cents, or 9.07 per cent, to $4.21 on 8.7 million shares.Enbridge Inc. (TSX:ENB). Energy. Down 55 cents, or 1.3 per cent, to $41.89, on 8.6 million shares.Premier Gold Mines Ltd. (TSX:PG). Gold. Up 15 cents, or 10 per cent, to $1.64 on 8.5 million shares.Aphria Inc. (TSX:APHA). Health care. Down 22 cents, or 3.03 per cent, to $7.04 on 7.6 million shares. The Canadian Press Some of the most active companies traded Thursday on the Toronto Stock Exchange:Toronto Stock Exchange (14,141.77, down 122.29 points).center_img Companies reporting major news:BlackBerry Ltd. (TSX:BB). Up 29 cents or 2.9 per cent to $10.22. Blackberry’s stock rose Thursday after the company’s third-quarter revenue and profit beat analyst estimates, with growth coming from its software and services business. The Waterloo, Ont.,-based technology company earned US$59 million in net income for the quarter ended Nov. 30, up from a loss of US$275 million in the same quarter last year. Revenue totalled US$226 million, which was even with last year’s third quarter and up from US$210 million in the second quarter this year.Scotiabank (TSX:BNS). Down 72 cents to $69.22. Scotiabank has signed a deal to sell its pension and related insurance businesses in the Dominican Republic. The Canadian bank says it will sell Scotia Crecer AFP and Scotia Seguros to Grupo Rizek. Financial terms of the deal were not immediately available, but Scotiabank says the transaction is not financially material to the bank.last_img read more

Liberal lawmakers challenge Trump with drug cost legislation

first_imgWASHINGTON — Challenging the Trump administration on a high-profile consumer issue, leading congressional liberals plan to unveil a package of bills Thursday designed to radically reduce what Americans pay for prescription drugs by linking prices to lower costs in other countries.The legislation has little chance of becoming law under a divided government, but it could put Republicans on the defensive by echoing themes and ideas that President Donald Trump has embraced at one time or another. The common denominator: Americans shouldn’t have to pay more for critical medications than consumers pay in other economically advanced countries.The Trump administration has put forward its own plan for reducing drug prices.Independent Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Democratic Rep. Elijah Cummings of Maryland plan to introduce the three bills on Thursday, according to the senator’s office. Cummings chairs the House Oversight and Government Reform committee, which is planning to take a major role on drug pricing issues.A new idea in the package would open up generic competition to patent-protected U.S. brand-name drugs that are deemed “excessively priced.” A second bill would allow Medicare to directly negotiate with drugmakers. The third bill would allow consumers to import lower-priced medications from Canada.“If the pharmaceutical industry will not end its greed … then we will end it for them,” Sanders said in a statement.The federal Health and Human Services Department would get a major new mission regulating drug prices.As a presidential candidate, Trump initially called for Medicare to negotiate drug prices and favoured allowing Americans to import lower-priced medications from abroad, something that many consumers already do even if it is not legal.But those ideas are political nonstarters for most Republicans, who favour a free-market approach to the U.S. pharmaceutical industry and prize its capacity for innovation.As president, Trump has unveiled a complex plan to lower drug costs, relying on dozens of regulatory actions. A key goal is to eliminate incentives for major actors like drugmakers, pharmacy managers and insurers to stifle competition at the expense of consumers. Independent experts say the administration’s proposals would have an impact but they don’t limit the ability of drug companies to set high prices.Time and again, Trump has complained that other countries where governments set drug prices are taking advantage of Americans. Indeed, one of his ideas would shift Medicare payments for drugs administered in doctors’ offices to a level based on international prices.“We are taking aim at the global freeloading that forces American consumers to subsidize lower prices in foreign countries through higher prices in our country,” the president said in unveiling that proposal shortly before last year’s congressional elections.Sanders and Cummings would go far beyond Trump’s proposals. Their legislation would essentially apply to any U.S. patent-protected brand-name drug, whether or not government programs are bearing its costs. By comparison, Trump’s international pricing proposal would not apply to retail pharmacy drugs purchased by Medicare beneficiaries or to medications for privately insured people.Under the lawmakers’ plan, drugs deemed “excessively priced” by HHS could face generic competition. A medication’s cost would be deemed “excessive” if its price in the U.S. is higher than the median, or midpoint, price in Canada, the United Kingdom, Germany, France and Japan.If the manufacturer is unwilling to cut its U.S. price, then the government could allow generic manufacturers to make a more affordable version of the medication. Generic companies taking on the task would have to pay “reasonable” royalties to the company holding the patent.The pharmaceutical industry is already adamantly opposed to Trump’s international pricing idea and is likely to fight the lawmakers’ proposal even harder.Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, The Associated Presslast_img read more

Provincial permits dont consider Species at Risk Act Environment Canada

first_imgA spokesperson for the Manitoba government said it considers the Species at Risk Act when reviewing development proposals and will have caribou range action plans by 2020.Eric Hebert-Daly of the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society said the report emphasizes what groups like his have been saying for years.“At the provincial level, we have a lot of work to do”’ he said. “Provincial laws are either missing or their flexibility is too flexible.”The latest assessment of woodland caribou suggest 81 per cent of Canada’s herds are in decline. Loss of another one-third of the population is expected “in the near term.”The main threat to their numbers is alteration of habitat, which reduces its productivity and allows access by predators.Wilkinson said the federal government is able to oblige provinces to immediately enforce the Species At Risk Act.But for now, he said, Ottawa will continue to work with the provinces on conservation agreements funded from allotments in the most recent budget.“That allows us to bring some money to the table around reforestation or a range of other things the provinces need to do to protect the caribou.”Caribou conservation is often seen to be in direct conflict with forestry and energy and the jobs they generate. In late March, Alberta delayed its own caribou range plans over economic concerns.“There tends to be a lot of fear in those (resource) communities about what those impacts would be,” Wilkinson said. “We have to avoid this being seen as an environment versus economy issue.” OTTAWA, O.N. — Recovery of Canada’s declining caribou herds is being hampered because provincial agencies that license development on the habitat of the threatened species aren’t required to follow federal environmental laws.“It is a concern,” said Jonathan Wilkinson, parliamentary secretary to Environment Minister Catherine McKenna.On Monday, Environment Canada released a report assessing how provinces are doing in protecting habitat for caribou, a threatened species in every jurisdiction that has them. The idea, said Wilkinson, was to examine actions on the ground and a province’s “legal architecture” to see if it was equivalent to federal legislation. The federal report also concludes that little conservation is taking place on the ground. Measures in almost every case are still in planning or draft stages.“We do need to start to see action on the ground,” Wilkinson said. “We’ve had several years of planning exercises. We need more action on the part of the provinces.”Saskatchewan’s Environment Ministry released a statement in response to the federal report saying it is committed protecting woodland caribou.“Saskatchewan is confident that it currently has all of the legislative tools necessary to protect critical habitat for woodland caribou.”center_img “What we have found is they are not,” he said. “There are gaps with respect to protection relative to species at risk nationally.”In every province, agencies that issue permits for forestry or energy development aren’t required to conform to the federal Species At Risk Act.The phrase “the discretion to authorize these activities is not subject to constraints consistent with those under SARA” appears again and again. Those constraints include requirements that at least two-thirds of critical habitat be left undeveloped.When the act was passed in 2002, the government of the time anticipated provinces would pass similar legislation.“With just a couple exceptions, the provinces haven’t done that,” Wilkinson said.British Columbia is developing such legislation. Ontario has an endangered species act, but it exempts forestry.last_img read more

Geoscience BC report says Northeast BC has potential for more light oil

first_img“This project has the potential to bring investment in light oil development to northeastern BC,” said project lead Brad Hayes. “This has significantly lower environmental impact than the heavier oils associated with Alberta’s oil sands, and could also help to diversify British Columbia’s economy.”Of the 27 locations, eight were rejected as unsuitable and 19 were deemed suitable for analysis. Those 19 suitable locations were then graded from A to C: – 2 – the Halfway and Chinkeh Formations – were graded ‘A’ – 1 was graded ‘A/B’; – 6 were graded ‘B’; and – 10 were graded ‘C’.“Light oil is significantly more valuable than the heavier oils. Making this new data publicly available helps the energy sector to focus exploration activity and responsible development,” said Geoscience BC Executive Vice President & Chief Scientific Officer Carlos Salas. “It also makes independent data about the potential for unconventional oil development in the region available to communities, First Nations and government.”Geoscience BC said the identification of new oil plays in Northeast B.C.’s portion of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin falls under its energy focus area and contributes to the organization’s objective to identify new natural resource opportunities.The full report can be read here: http://cdn.geosciencebc.com/project_data/GBCReport2018-20/GBCR2018-20_Resource_Oil_Report.pdf FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – A new report published by Geoscience BC today has graded the potential for high-value light and medium oil at 27 locations in northeastern B.C.Geoscience BC said that while the area is well-known for its natural gas reserves, little research has been done to identify the potential for accessing lighter oil in the region since the widespread adoption of horizontal drilling and multi-stage hydraulic fracturing.Titled ‘Identification of New Resource Oil Plays in Northeast British Columbia’s Portion of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin,’ Geoscience BC said the project seeks to address that knowledge gap.last_img read more

Air strike kills 13 civilians, mostly children, in Afghanistan, says UN

first_imgKabul: At least 13 civilians were killed, mostly children, in an air strike by “international forces” in the northern Afghan city of Kunduz late last week, the United Nations said Monday. The strike happened between late Friday and early Saturday in support of ground operations conducted by pro-government forces fighting against Taliban militants in the area. “Initial fact-finding indicates that 10 of those killed were children, part of the same extended family whom were displaced by fighting elsewhere in the country,” the UN mission in Afghanistan said in a statement. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from USThe US is the only member of the international coalition in Afghanistan that provides air support in the conflict. A NATO spokesperson told AFP the coalition was investigating the claims. The deaths come as ordinary Afghans continues to bear the brunt of the war in Afghanistan, with more civilians killed in the Afghan war in 2018 than during any other year on record, according to a UN report. The uptick in violence in 2018 coincides with a significant increase in the number of deaths caused by the “deliberate targeting of civilians”, according to the report, mostly stemming from suicide attacks by insurgents allied with the Taliban or Islamic State (IS). Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential pollsAn increase in air strikes by US and Afghan forces also led to more civilian deaths in 2018, with more than 500 civilians killed by “aerial operations for the first time on record”. Fighting continues to flare across Afghanistan even as the US and Taliban press forward in peace talks aimed at ending nearly 18 years of fighting. The ongoing peace talks with the Taliban follow years of escalating violence in Afghanistan.last_img read more

Ggn family threatens mass suicide over police inaction

first_imgGurugram: Mohammad Sajid and his family that was subjected to physical violence on the day of Holi in Gurugram’s Bhoop Singh area, has now threatened to commit mass suicide over police inaction. The family has accused district police and civil administration of favouring the goons and have claimed that they are being pressured to withdraw the FIR. “The matter is in public domain. Everyone knows how goons have deliberately attacked us in a preplanned manner. Still, the district police are not helping us and allowing alleged attackers and their family members to threaten us to withdraw the FIR,” said Mohamad Akhtar, one of the victims.”They come to our house and abuse our women and girls. If the district administration and police will not help us to bring justice in this case, we will go for mass suicide,” Akhtar said. The victim’s family has submitted a memorandum to Sohna SDM for a speedy trial. “The local police have registered FIR against two youths of our family in a bid to put pressure on us,” Akhtar said. Meanwhile, Gurugram (South) DCP Himanshu Garg said that both the groups were involved in the altercation. The police had arrested 10 persons for attacking the family on March 21. There was a change in events when there was a cross-FIR was filed against the family. This riled the family to an extent that even planned to leave the city till they were stopped in doing so by the top police officials. The Muslim family in Gurugram that was attacked by a mob of 12-20 people on the day of Holi (March 21) with rods and sticks. The family had been living in Gurugram for the past 15 years. According to the FIR registered at Bhondsi police station, the incident took place when Sajid’s relatives had come to visit on Holi. In the complaint, Sajid’s nephew, Dilshad, alleged that they were playing cricket in a vacant plot near the house when some boys confronted them and said, “What are you doing here? Go to Pakistan and play.” When Sajid intervened, one of the two men on the bike slapped him, Dilshad alleged. In the moments that followed, the duo was joined by several others, allegedly armed with sticks, rods and swords, who barged into the family’s home, attacked them and stole their valuables. Videos recorded by the victims show them trying to close the door to the terrace, even as the accused try to break it down. In the video, a group of men can be seen beating up a man with rods and sticks, while another lies in the corner, even as two women plead with the attackers to stop.last_img read more

Sensex snaps 4-day winning streak, drops 180 pts

first_imgMumbai: Breaking its four-day rising streak, the BSE Sensex dropped about 180 points Wednesday on profit booking and forecast of below-normal monsoon this year. Despite a strong rally in global equities, Indian market failed to sustain at lifetime highs led by losses in oil and gas, telecom, metal and healthcare stocks. After swinging nearly 450 points, the 30-share Sensex settled 179.53 points, or 0.46 per cent lower at 38,877.12. The broader NSE Nifty too pared early gains and ended 69.25 points, or 0.59 per cent, down at 11,643.95. Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscal Benchmark indices gave up all the early gains and ended in red after Skymet predicted below normal monsoon for this year, said Sunil Sharma, Chief Investment Officer, Sanctum Wealth Management. “This news comes just a day before RBI is expected to cut rates by 25 bps and adopt a pro-growth stance. However, expectation of poor rainfall and already slow economic growth alongside subdued inflation may pressurise RBI to go for a higher rate cut, thus surprising the street positively,” Sharma added. Also Read – Food grain output seen at 140.57 mt in current fiscal on monsoon boost The RBI’s Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) is holding a three-day meeting between April 2 – 4 for the first policy statement for 2019-20. SBI was the biggest loser in the Sensex pack, shedding 2.40 per cent, followed by Yes Bank, Bharti Airtel, L&T, Sun Pharma, M&M, ICICI Bank, ONGC, RIL, Asian Paints, Vedanta and HUL, which lost up to 2.37 per cent. On the other hand, Maruti, HCL Tech, HDFC, Tata Steel, PowerGrid, Hero MotoCorp and TCS ended with gains of up to 2.78 per cent. Sectorally, the BSE oil and gas, telecom, capital goods, energy and healthcare indices fell up to 2.06 per cent. Broader indices too ended in the red, with the BSE Midcap and Smallcap slipping up to 0.87 per cent. Meanwhile, foreign institutional investors (FIIs) remained net buyers in the capital markets, putting in Rs 543.36 crore Tuesday, while domestic institutional investors (DIIs) sold equities to the tune of Rs 437.70 crore, provisional data available with stock exchanges showed. In Asia, Hong Kong’s Hang Seng jumped 1.22 per cent, Korea’s Kospi rose 1.20 per cent, Japan’s Nikkei ended 0.97 per cent higher and Shanghai Composite Index gained 1.24 per cent. In Europe, Frankfurt’s DAX was up 1.33 per cent, Paris CAC 40 rose 0.74 per cent, while London’s FTSE slipped 0.04 per cent in early deals. The benchmark Brent crude futures rose 0.53 per cent to USD 69.74 per barrel. Meanwhile, the rupee appreciated 30 paise to 68.44 against the US dollar intra-day.last_img read more

28 killed, 200 injured in army operations in Iraq’s Fallujah: hospital…

first_imgFALLUJAH – A total of 28 civilians were killed and 200 others injured in the western Iraqi city of Anbar since the start of military operations there weeks ago, a senior medical official told Anadolu Agency.“Most of the casualties were caused by the army shelling of homes, government buildings and worship places in the city,” said Abdel-Sattar Lawas, director of Fallujah General Hospital.The tally, however, does not include armed tribesmen killed in clashes with army forces, he said. The predominantly-Sunni Anbar province, of which Fallujah is a major city, has been rocked by violence since Iraqi security forces dismantled a months-old anti-government sit-in outside the provincial capital Ramadi in late December.The sit-in was a protest against perceived anti-Sunni discrimination by the Shiite-dominated government of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki.Mohamed al-Bagari, spokesman of the anti-government protest camp in Fallujah, said that clashes were still raging between armed tribesmen and army forces in the city.He said that two tribesmen were killed and ten others injured in clashes between the two sides on Friday.Al-Bagari cited “difficulties” in moving the corpses of the victims to hospital, leaving residents with no other option but to bury their dead in their backyards.last_img read more