Rail panel case Calcutta HC extends interim protection from arrest to Mukul

first_imgKolkata: The Calcutta High Court on Tuesday extended interim protection from arrest to BJP leader Mukul Roy in a case of alleged payout for a railway panel membership till November 8. A division bench comprising justices S Munshi and S Dasgupta adjourned the hearing of Roy’s plea till November 5 on a prayer by the West Bengal government. Appearing for the state, public prosecutor Saswata Mukherjee told the court that the police have collected documents and materials relevant to the case and need time to verify these. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari Puja The division bench then said it will hear the matter after the Durga Puja vacation on November 5 and extended interim protection from arrest to Roy till November 8. Roy was first granted a week-long protection from arrest by the high court on August 29 and it was extended from time to time. The BJP leader moved the high court seeking anticipatory bail in a case of cheating filed by Santu Ganguly, a businessman, against Baban Ghosh, who claims to be a local labour wing leader of the saffron party. Ganguly alleged in the FIR that Ghosh had taken Roy’s name while assuring him membership of a Zonal Railway Users Consultative Committee and took a bribe of several lakhs from him. Following Ghosh’s arrest in the case by the Kolkata Police on August 21, Roy moved the high court seeking anticipatory bail since his name had cropped up in the case.last_img read more

Spotify just got sued for 2B and this Canadianowned company laid the

first_imgAdvertisement One of the reasons recording artists like Bob Dylan hire Jeff Price is because they’re not getting paid.Price is the founder of Audiam, a Canadian-owned company that collects royalties for major artists, including Dylan, Jack White, Aimee Mann, Kris Kristofferson, James Taylor and Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons.Jeff Price, founder of Audiam, says Spotify hasn’t been paying its fair share of royalties to songwriters and music publishers. (Courtesy of Audiam)Price has no qualms about going after digital streaming servicesthat millions of people use to listen to music. Advertisement Login/Register With: Twitter Advertisementcenter_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Headphones are seen in front of a logo of online music streaming service Spotify in this Feb. 18, 2014 photo. Spotify is facing a $2-billion lawsuit from artists. (Christian Hartmann/Reuters) Facebook “I was particularly frustrated by Spotify,” Price tells me on Day 6.Price says streaming services do pay royalties, but not always to the songwriters. That’s where he comes in.“I worked very very, very hard to provide Spotify all the information it needed to do what it was supposed to do over a three-year period, repeatedly sending information, and they still wouldn’t change the way they were operating.”Now his data is being used in a whopping $2-billion ($1.6-billion US) lawsuit brought against Spotify by artists like Tom Petty, Neil Young and Stevie Nicks.last_img read more