Farmer Wants a Wife Alberta bachelor stars in Belgian reality TV show

first_imgBjorn Bonjean of Spirit Hills honey winery in Alberta is shown in in this undated handout photo. Bjorn Bonjean didn’t have trouble dating in southern Alberta — he just hadn’t found the right woman, when producers of a reality television show in Belgium came calling. The 28-year-old winemaker is one of five farmers from around the globe vying for the hearts of Belgian women in the show that echoes the long-running American dating series “The Bachelor” and its spinoffs.”Boer Zoekt Vrouw,” which translates to “Farmer Wants a Wife,” has been on the air for about 10 seasons but its latest stars bachelors in other countries who are originally from Belgium. HO / THE CANADIAN PRESS Advertisement “They roll up their sleeves, have a passion for their business, but they lack that nice Flemish woman,” says the show’s website.Filmed earlier this year, the show just started airing this week on the VTM network. Bonjean says he’s sworn to secrecy on the outcome set for November.“I can’t tell you if it ends with a proposal or not,” he says. “It’s not like ‘The Bachelor’ … The entire idea is to give the opportunity of something happening. But there’s no expectation of a proposal or even a relationship after it.”But Bonjean did reveal that he’s happy.“I’m happy with the choice that I’ve made.”Bonjean was seven when his family moved to Canada from Grobbendonk in northern Belgium. They now run Spirit Hills honey winery near Millarville, southwest of Calgary. Bonjean is head winemaker, using honey from the farm’s own beehives to create various wines and sangria.The show’s producers originally wanted both Bonjean and his sister to be part of the season, as bachelorettes have been featured in some versions of the show. But she was dating someone and didn’t speak Flemish or Dutch as well as her brother, said Bonjean.He was also dating someone at the time and turned down the offer. Months later, after a break up, he agreed to join the show.Bonjean said it’s nothing like “The Bachelor.” There are no rose ceremonies. And there’s little drama.After airing profiles of the five farmers, 1,500 women sent the show photos and letters. About 150 wanted to meet Bonjean.In the first episode, the bachelors travel to Belgium and, after putting on black eye masks, are lead into a horse riding arena and onto a stage of hay bales before a crowd of screaming women.They each meet 10 women in a speed-dating round and, after choosing five, go on an afternoon group date. They then select three to bring back to their home countries.Bonjean said it was awkward at first talking with potential partners while cameras were rolling, but he got used to it. He also used his trip to Belgium to visit with his grandmother and meet with wine importers, who agreed to market Spirit Hills in the country.“We chose Bjorn Bonjean as he’s good looking, in a good age category, and he runs a lovely, organic farm on a magical place on Earth,” the show’s story editor, Katrien Geens, said in an email.She also refused to hint at whether he finds love.“How it ends, remains a secret, until aired.”— By Chris Purdy in Edmonton Login/Register With: Advertisement Advertisementcenter_img Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook MILLARVILLE, Alta. — Bjorn Bonjean didn’t have trouble dating in southern Alberta, he just hadn’t found the right woman … then producers of a reality television show in Belgium came calling.The 28-year-old winemaker is one of five farmers from around the globe vying for the hearts of Belgian women in the show that’s similar to the long-running North American series “The Bachelor” and its spinoffs.“Boer Zoekt Vrouw,” which translates to “Farmer Wants a Wife,” has been on the air for about 10 seasons but its latest series stars bachelors in other countries who are originally from Belgium. Besides Bjorn from Canada, there’s Jitse, who runs a therapeutic care farm in Norway; Jeroen, a dairy farmer in Germany; Manu, an olive farmer in South Africa; and Jan, a cowboy in Australia.last_img read more

We Can I Can Reduce My Risk of Cancer DH

first_img Related Items:#magneticmedianews, #WorldCancerDay Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppPort of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago. February 4, 2017.  The large number of deaths from breast and cervical cancer in the Caribbean is very alarming, since cervical cancer is largely preventable, and breast cancer can be detected early and treated successfully.Executive Director, Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA), Dr C. James Hospedales said, “Common modifiable risk factors that contribute to the development of cancers include tobacco use, unhealthy diets, physical inactivity and harmful use of alcohol.”  He also stated that, “There is strong evidence that a person’s risk of developing cancer can be substantially reduced through healthy lifestyles. A reduction in modifiable risk factors will contribute to a decrease in cancer cases, and as a consequence, deaths and costs from the disease in our Region.”This year, and through 2018, the theme for World Cancer Day (WCD) is “We can. I can” focusing on how everyone – collectively and individually – can do their part to reduce the global burden of cancer. The 3-year campaign which started in 2016, outlines actions that communities and individuals can take to save lives by achieving greater equity in cancer care and making fighting cancer a priority at the highest political levels.Cancer remains the second leading cause of death in the Caribbean, where rates of death from cervical cancer, breast, prostate and colon cancer are 2 to 9 times higher compared to the United States.  Dr Hospedales said “Cervical cancer is perhaps the most preventable, yet a recent study by CARPHA and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed that 16 of the 18 countries for which data were reported, cervical cancer accounted for 4.5%–18.2% of cancer deaths.”CARPHA encourages persons to adopt healthier lifestyles to prevent cancer.  Here is what you can do now to reduce your risk of cancer:avoid the use of tobaccolimit alcohol usekeep a healthy weightget sufficient physical activity increase daily intake of fruits and vegetables to 5 or more servings per dayparticipation in screening programmes is strongly encouraged for prevention of cervical cancer and early detection of breast, colon and rectum cancerget vaccinated against the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and Hepatitis BSo, on World Cancer Day, are you acting responsibly to prevent cancer?“We can”, collectively, inspire action, create healthy environments, build a quality workforce and shape policy changes for cancer prevention. As an individual “I can” understand that early detection saves lives. I can support others, and I can make healthy lifestyle choices.Act NOW to prevent cancer! We can…I can!#MagneticMediaNews #WorldCancerDay Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

DOD VA Health Care Partnership Adds Ft Jacksons Hospital

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR A regional health care partnership that started with the medical center at Fort Gordon and two Veterans Affairs hospitals in Georgia has been extended to Fort Jackson’s Moncrief Army Community Hospital and a VA Medical Center in Columbia, S.C.The partnership started in 2012 with a $2.9 million grant from DOD and VA allowing Fort Gordon’s Eisenhower Army Medical Center and VA hospitals in Augusta and Dublin, Ga., to coordinate patient care and identify opportunities for sharing facilities, personnel and services, reported the Augusta Chronicle.  Adding the two Co­lum­bia facilities should expand opportunities for collaboration, according to Col. John Lamoureux, chairman of the Georgia-Lina Federal Healthcare Executive Council and Eisenhower’s commander.“We have a shared interest in caring for our nation’s service members and veterans,” Lamoureux said of the five hospitals involved. “This cooperation allows us to reduce appointment backlogs, keep our physicians fully engaged and, most importantly, provide the best care possible for our patients.”He said that “this partnership stands as an example of the future of military and VA medicine.”The partnership started with orthopedic patients from the Dublin VA going to Fort Gordon for surgery and the Augusta VA for rehabilitation, according to the story. The initiative came in response to a rise in the number of veterans receiving disability compensation as the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan began to draw down.last_img read more

A digital world

first_imgAmor Fati (love of one’s fate), a show that exhibits digital works by Santosh Jain is being organised in the Capital. The show that opens today at Gallery Pioneer is curated by Niyatee Shindee. Jain’s work encompasses all the various strands of new media technologies. Her artworks display an exceptional degree of conceptual sophistication, hi-tech suave, social relevance and dexterous skills, all born through the computer screen, media technology being its riveting factor. The artiste’s work is strongly invested in the conceptual rather than the craft of making. Like all digital art, the work displays an enchanting etiquette. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’All the works are attitudes in which one sees everything that happens in life, including suffering and loss, in a positive light. This philosophy resonates in Jain’s fearless attitude towards her life and her art. Her perceptive nature helps her photograph the often hidden yet honest stories of destiny, fate, despair and hope. Her works are a sensitive and empathetic portrayal of the various stages and seasons of life, with perseverance and hope emerging as an underlying metaphor. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix‘I’ve always been exploring and experimenting with different art forms. With the camera and digital art, I feel I’ve finally found a language through which I can converse with people. I feel through this medium I’m now able to express what I feel inside with ease’, says the artiste.In the work Feline, the woman protagonist is present in eight roles. Either lounging or squatting or toothlessly grinning at the viewer, or lost in the domesticity of household chores or simply gazing into the distance very poetically, each are unique in their own worlds yet harmoniously bound by the scape with an expectant air. From My Attic series allows the viewer an intimate gaze into the artist’s life and surroundings and nudge him to examine closely held memoirs of stored experiences and feelings left in the recesses of the mind. These works display a meditative and transcendental quality.Choices, Dream Catcher and Chai Boy are chronicles of urban strugglers and survivors. While they showcase the realities of the downtrodden and demoralised, they are all laced with the phenomenon of hope and make the viewer sense the opportunity for the subjects to re-begin and re-build.Where: Gallery Pioneer, Lado SaraiWhen: On till 20 SeptemberTiming: 11 am till 7 pmlast_img read more