Olunga first Kenyan to score hat-trick in Laliga

first_img0Shares0000Olunga stepped of the bench to score three and assist one to become the first ever Kenyan to score in Spanish top division. Photo/COURTESYNAIROBI, Kenya, Jan 13 – Harambee Stars forward Michael Olunga made history on Saturday when he scored a hat-trick for his Girona side in their 6-0 victory over Las Palmas.Olunga stepped off the bench to score three and assist one to become the first ever Kenyan to notch a hat-trick in the Spanish top division. Olunga netted the second goal for Girona in the 57th minute with a brilliant shot into the roof of the net after being released inside the box by a superb lofted pass from Johan Mojica to make the scores 2-0.Michael Olunga celebrating with the ball after completing the hat-trick.Photo/COURTESYOlunga was at it again in the 70th minute after Las Palmas defender Cruz Raul made a huge mistake and the Kenyan striker had an easy task to put the ball into the back of the net to see the scores read 4-0.He completed his remarkable hat-trick nine minutes later when he was in the right place at the right time to get to the rebound inside the box and gleefully rifle the ball low inside the left post and seal the win.Girona dismantled Las Palmas after completing a memorable second half in which five goals were scored, three of them from Olunga, who also became the first player to hit a hat-trick for the Club.Olunga celebrating with team-mates. Photo/COURTESYThe other three goals were scored by Stuani, Borja García and Portu to enable Girona occupy ninth position on the table with 26 points.Girona showed intent from the beginning seeing them enjoy possession in the opening 10 minutes with Mojica being the chief destroyer.0Shares0000(Visited 5 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

MH370: New search area

first_imgIn a dramatic development in the search for MH370 the search area is to be moved back to a zone approximately 1700km west of Perth, Western Australia, previously dismissed in late March.MH370, with 239 passengers and crew vanished on a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing on March 8.Airlineratings.com has learnt from US sources that the Australian Joint Agency Coordination Centre will announce Thursday June 26th that a six-week analysis of all information related to the Boeing 777’s flight path has resulted in a 500km shift in the search area to the south-west.The Australian Transport Safety Bureau, which is leading the international search, confirmed the area of highest probability would be “further south.”The search area is still located on what is termed the seventh arc based on the UK based Inmarsat’s satellite interrogation of the Boeing 777 – just much further south.While the ATSB would not be drawn on precise detail the US sources told AirlineRatings.com that the two ocean floor mapping vessels the Fugro Equator and the Chinese PLA-Navy’s Zhu Kezhen are in the area.These ships will map the sea bed, which is up to 6000m deep, ahead of a commercial contractor starting a side scan sonar search with a towed Orion vehicle, more capable than the Bluefin 21 used earlier.The search area is 60,000 sq kms and it could still take up to 12 months to cover the entire area.When the search first started in the southern Indian Ocean on March 18 the initial search area was 2500km south-west of Perth.On March 28 on an updated assessment from the ATSB it was moved 1900km due west of Perth.However, it was only an aerial search.When Ocean Shield was deployed early in April fresh intelligence from Malaysia led the search to be moved 800km north-east – essentially due west of Exmouth.The detection of what was thought to be black box pings within days kept the search in that region for over a month despite some misgivings at the ATSB.After the failure to find MH370 in that area the ATSB convened a comprehensive review of all the data including the critical Inmarsat satellite communications with the Boeing 777.AirlineRatings.com understands from the US source that at least three independent groups were formed to analyse all the information and all have come to the same conclusion on the most likely crash site of MH370.last_img read more

Don’t Miss Out on Pi Day! Top Tips for Mystery Caches

first_img Can you spot the mystery within this post?Share with your Friends:More Mystery Caches (also known as Puzzle caches or Unknown caches) are a type of geocache for those who enjoy an extra challenge.They require geocachers to solve complicated puzzles in order to decode the correct cache coordinates or crack secret clues to unlock a cache’s stash. If you haven’t encountered this kind of cache before the prospect may seem daunting, but have no fear! Mystery Caches are fun way to spice up any geocaching adventure while flexing your beefy brain muscles.Working on the solution for GC2400Z “Truncated Icosahedron,” a puzzle cache by PhilNi SharePrint RelatedHappy Pi Day, Earn Two SouvenirsFebruary 20, 2015In “Cache In Trash Out”Top Tips for Puzzle CachesAugust 12, 2014In “Learn”A Puzzling Tour — Cube Root of 39.304 (GCNCMA) — Geocache of the WeekMarch 5, 2015In “Geocache of the Week” Does the thought of having to decode encrypted messages make you break out in hives? If yes, then take a deep breath and find your happy place because we have just the tips to sooth your Mystery Cache anxiety and prepare you for March 14th, 2015.About to sing an “Ode to the Golgafrinchan Phone Workers”…GC32A0Hcenter_img So don your trenchcoat and channel your inner Sherlock.(‘Cause who wouldn’t want to be Benedict Cumberbatch?). Here are Geocaching HQ’s top tips for Mystery Caches:Practice Makes Perfect. Start easy by tackling Mystery Caches that have a one or two star difficulty rating. The more caches you conquer over time the more tricks of the trade you’ll pick up and the easier it’ll become.Check what type of puzzle needs to be solved. There are different kinds of Mystery Caches that call for different strategies, so before you head out check to see what the requirements entail. Some caches are in-the-field, meaning you have to use visual clues from the surrounding location to decipher the coordinates or unlock the cache. Other caches can be solved before you even step out the door! These ask you to solve a particular puzzle off of the geocache’s webpage or lookup information on the internet.Gather the Mystery Gang. Two heads are better than one! Bring your geocaching pals along, not only is geocaching more fun when you have your buddies but they can help you brainstorm through those extra tricky questions.It’s all in the name. A hint to the cache’s location may be located in the cache’s or cache owner’s name or give you an idea of where the cache may be or what it may look like.When in doubt use Google. Search engines may not have the answer to everything, but they have the answer for a lot of things. So if you’re truly stuck, look to the internet to give you a helping hand. Some cache pages may even include answer checkers to see if you guessed the correct coordinates.Check for invisible ink. Sometimes cache owners will hide clues on a geocache’s webpage in white font. Highlight the page to reveal the secrets that were right in front of your nose the whole time. Bonus points if you caught this one! You’re a Puzzler already!The source code isn’t just a movie. Cache owners may add comments with hints in the cache’s html source code. To find this open the source code on your browser’s menu selection and search for comments.Stumped? Don’t hesitate to send a message to the cache owner. There’s no shame in asking for help…and a small hint might just be what you need to get started.Mystery caches are an excellent way to sharpen the geocaching saw. If you’re looking for a little cache-speration check out our Mystery Cache Pinterest board. Want to take all this info (and more) with you? The Geocaching Shop has just the right book for you: How To Puzzle Cache.Do you love a good Mystery? Tell us about your puzzling geocaching experiences or share your favorite puzzle tips! Be careful not to reveal any cache spoilers. Earn one out of two souvenirs on Saturday, March 14 Pi Day by finding a Mystery Cache.(Earn the other souvenir by attending any Geocaching event on March 14)last_img read more

12 hours agoLazio boss Inzaghi upset with Celtic comeback

first_imgLazio boss Inzaghi upset with Celtic comebackby Carlos Volcano12 hours agoSend to a friendShare the loveLazio boss Simone Inzaghi was left frustrated with their Europa League defeat to Celtic.The Biancocelesti had taken the lead and were in control only to lose 2-1 in the final stages.“That’s the ugly thing about football, you don’t get the results you deserve. It’s difficult to swallow a defeat like that,” Inzaghi told Sky Sport Italia.“We must realise that we won’t lose many if we maintain this spirit for 90 minutes. It’s already happened to us this season, but I couldn’t have asked much more from my lads.“The second goal was an individual error and you pay a heavy price when a player is allowed to lose his marker. It was a performance where we certainly deserved a different result, but we need to keep working, because evidently what we’re doing is not enough. We must keep believing in ourselves and I feel we’ll go far if we play like this.“It’s a pity, we deserved more in this wonderful arena.” About the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

NBA AllStar Deron Williams Hosts Holiday Party With Autism Speaks

first_imgIn an effort to bring holiday cheer to single mothers and their children with autism who were affected by Hurricane Sandy, Brooklyn Nets guard Deron Williams and his wife Amy hosted a special holiday event Saturday, Dec. 22 at Distilled in New York City.Deron and Amy Williams and Family with Autism Speaks President Liz FeldCredit/Copyright: Danielle Rabin, Rubenstein CommunicationsIn partnership with the Williams’s Point of Hope Foundation, which is dedicated to improving the quality of life of children and their families, and Autism Speaks, the world’s leading autism science and advocacy organization, more than 30 New York families enjoyed a festive holiday celebration. The event was catered by renowned chef Shane Lyons, who donated his time and made the afternoon extra special. The families were also gifted with toys, some of which were featured on the Toys”R”Us Toy Guide for Differently-Abled Kids and the Ten Toys That Speak to Autism.Deron Willaims Signs Basketballs for Autism SpeaksCredit/Copyright: Danielle Rabin, Rubenstein Communications“This is exactly what the Point of Hope Foundation is all about – bringing smiles to the faces of those who need our assistance while having a great time,” said Williams, a three-time NBA All-Star and two-time Olympic gold medalist. “We are excited to team up with Autism Speaks to brighten the holiday season for families, particularly following the hurricane.”“It’s wonderful to celebrate the holidays with families from our community,” Liz Feld, president of Autism Speaks said. “And we are so excited to join Point of Hope and our friend Deron Williams to celebrate each other in such a meaningful way. On a day like today, we’re all one family.”FreshDirect also participated in the event by donating family meal packages, including fresh produce, and family style prepared turkey dinners to all the families attending.“We want to do everything we can to help our community recover from the hurricane’s aftermath,” said Jason Ackerman, CEO of FreshDirect. “That’s why we’re honored to partner with the Williams’ Point of Hope Foundation and Autism Speaks to bring fresh and healthy food to all the families in need as they rebuild during this difficult time, especially during the holidays.”last_img read more

Kylian Mbappe reminds Wenger of Pele

first_imgFormer Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger revealed he saw Pele in Kylian Mbappe from the very moment he first set eyes on him.The 20-year-old forward has already achieved things in his short career that most footballers can only dream about and appears destined for a long and glorious future.Mbappe first rose to prominence at AS Monaco during the 2016/17 campaign, where he became a regular scorer to help the club win the Ligue 1 title over the heavily-fancied Paris Saint-Germain.The Parisians then secured a €180m transfer for Mbappe’s services the following season to make him the world’s second most expensive player of all-time behind team-mate Neymar, who arrived from Barcelona for €222m.Mbappe later helped PSG claim a domestic treble in his debut campaign and then went on to win the World Cup with France last summer at Russia, which saw him even score their last goal in the 4-2 win over Croatia in the final at Moscow.It meant that Mbappe, who was 19 at the time, became only the second teenager to score in a World Cup final after Pele, who managed a brace in Brazil’s 5-2 victory over Sweden in the 1958 final.Since then, The French youngster has been regularly compared to the legendary Pele.And this season has seen Mbappe reach even greater heights with 25 goals and 14 assists in 30 appearances for PSG.Opinion: Neymar needs to apologize to PSG’s supporters Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 14, 2019 After such a dramatic summer during the transfer window, Neymar truly needs to apologize to all the PSG supporters this weekend.When Neymar finished last…Lyon defender Marcelo claimed this week that stopping Mbappe has proven to be an even more daunting task than five-time Ballon d’Or winner Lionel Messi.Now Wenger has given his verdict on Mbappe and recalled the moment he first saw him in action.“When I saw him the first time in the first period, I said: ‘It’s Pele,’” Wenger told CNN.“He has a combination of pace, intelligence, relaxed attitude to deal with stress. You cannot give that to people.“It looks like all the ingredients are there. Now for him, it’s how much does he continue to improve and how much can he keep a rigorous attitude to think: ‘Okay, where do I go from there.’“When a guy is a world champion at 20 years of age, has won championships — two or three already — what can you say? And the numbers don’t lie. He’s an exceptional football player and France is gifted to have him.”Mbappe will likely feature for PSG today in their Ligue 1 match against Nimes at home with kick-off set for 5:00 PM (CET).MOSCOW, RUSSIA – JULY 15: Kylian Mbappe of France celebrates with the World Cup trophy following the 2018 FIFA World Cup Final between France and Croatia at Luzhniki Stadium on July 15, 2018 in Moscow, Russia. (Photo by Matthias Hangst/Getty Images)last_img read more

Thermodynamics of visual images may help us see the world

first_img Explore further More information: Greg J. Stephens, et al. “Statistical Thermodynamics of Natural Images.” PRL 110, 018701 (2013). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.018701 (a) A grayscale image of a forest. Photo by Dan Ruderman. (b) The same image after it is quantized into two equally populated levels of black and white. The researchers found that small patches within this quantized image retain substantial local structure. This finding led them to discover that the photo is scale-invariant—its structure stays the same as its scale changes. Credit: Greg J. Stephens, et al. ©2013 American Physical Society (a) 4 x 4 patches from the quantized forest image with the lowest energy states, starting with the lowest energy states of all: solid black and white blocks. The other patches are local minima, and many of them can be interpreted as lines and edges. The scientists speculate that the visual system might build neurons that identify these local minima in order to build a representation of the world. In part (b), the researchers computed the average light-intensity images that correspond to those in part (a). These average images resemble those that trigger neuron responses in the primary visual cortex. Credit: Greg J. Stephens, et al. ©2013 American Physical Society This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Copyright 2013 Phys.org All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of Phys.org. The scientists saw this scale invariance as a hint that natural images may have something in common with a physical system at a critical point. In physical systems, scale invariance emerges only when the temperature reaches a critical value, at which point a phase transition occurs between two phases characterized by different forms of order.To examine whether the ensemble of natural images has its own critical point, the researchers treated the distribution of pixels as the Boltzmann distribution for a physical system, where the patterns of pixels in the small patches are associated with different energy levels according to their probability. Remarkably, as the patch size increased so too did a peak in the specific heat, a thermodynamic variable that characterizes fluctuations in the energy of the ensemble. These results suggest a sharp transition in the thermodynamic limit of large patch sizes, similar to how a physical system reaches this limit at a critical temperature.The researchers found that this approach to the thermodynamics of images also shares similarities with Zipf-like distributions. According to Zipf’s law, elements in a group (for example, words in a book) that are sorted from most common to least common will follow a pattern where the second most common element is 1/2 as common as the first, the third most common element is 1/3 as common as the first, etc. Zipf-like distributions have been found to hold for many different situations, and here the scientists found that they also closely describe the distribution of the size of pixel patches ranked by the structure as determined by their black and white pixels.Perhaps the most interesting implication of viewing natural images from a thermodynamics perspective is what it reveals about the nature of image patches that correspond to the low energy states. The patches with the absolute lowest energy states are those that are either all black or all white. However, a small number of patches have pixels in both states yet are considered local minima, since flipping any single pixel would increase the energy. Looking closer at these patches, the researchers found that many of them have distinct patterns, such as edges between dark and light regions.The researchers speculate that the importance of these local minima in natural images may help us and other creatures “see” our surroundings, even when our eyes don’t absorb every pixel. The visual system may build neurons that are tuned to these “basins of attraction.” In other words, these low-energy patches may assist the brain in filling in the details using some kind of error-correcting code based on the thermodynamics of the visual world. A team of researchers at Princeton University has taken a closer look at images of nature and proposed that the scale invariance of images closely resembles the thermodynamics of physical systems at a critical point, with the distribution of pixels in the images analogous to the distribution of particle states in a physical system such as a ferromagnet. The parts of an image that correspond to the low-energy states, or local minima, have surprisingly interpretable structure, and these thermodynamic characteristics may help the brain see.The researchers, Greg J. Stephens, Thierry Mora, Gašper Tkačik, and William Bialek, at Princeton University, have published their study on the thermodynamics of images in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters.In their study, the scientists analyzed an ensemble of photographs taken in a forest at Hacklebarney State Park in New Jersey. The researchers converted the grayscale camera images to binary (black and white) images. Although intensity information was lost in the quantization, many details such as the structure of the trees and a body of water could still be identified. The worlds smallest 3D HD display Journal information: Physical Review Letters The researchers then divided each binary image into much smaller patches composed of 3 x 3 and 4 x 4 pixels and examined the distribution of black and white pixels in these patches. To quantify how much structure is present in these tiny segments of natural images, the researchers measured the entropy of the distribution of pixels. Randomly distributed pixels would give an entropy level of 9 and 16 bits, respectively, for the 3 x 3 and 4 x 4 pixel regions. But the researchers found that the entropy levels of the same-sized regions from the photo were only 6.5 and 11.2 bits, suggesting that substantial local structure remains in the tiny patches.To explore how local image structure changes with scale, the researchers averaged neighboring pixels within each image and repeated their patch analysis. After such “coarse-graining,” the image had lower resolution, but remarkably both the entropy and pixel distribution were unchanged from the original image. Even after repeating this coarse-graining process four times, the pixel distributions in the small square regions remained the same, indicating that the photo is scale-invariant—its structure stays the same as its scale changes. Citation: Thermodynamics of visual images may help us see the world (2013, February 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-02-thermodynamics-visual-images-world.html (Phys.org)—Although researchers know that a large portion of the brain is devoted to visual processing, exactly how we interpret the complex patterns within natural scenes is far from understood. One question scientists ask is, is there something about the structure of the visual world itself that enables our brains to process and understand our visual surroundings, and is this structure something that can be described quantitatively?last_img read more

Scientists harvest energy from beams selfinduced selfsustaining vibrations in airflow

first_imgThe energy harvester consists of a carbon fiber beam with a piezoelectric sensor and stepper motor to adjust the angle of attack of the airflow in the wind tunnel. Unlike previous designs, the system does not require a secondary vibrating structure because the beam itself vibrates, reducing the volume of the harvester and increasing its efficiency. Credit: Zakaria, et al. ©2015 AIP Publishing UK scientists develop optimum piezoelectric energy harvesters Citation: Scientists harvest energy from beam’s self-induced, self-sustaining vibrations in airflow (2015, July 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-07-scientists-harvest-energy-self-induced-self-sustaining.html More information: Mohamed Y. Zakaria, et al. “Experimental analysis of energy harvesting from self-induced flutter of a composite beam.” Applied Physics Letters. DOI: 10.1063/1.4926876 Journal information: Applied Physics Letters © 2015 Phys.orgcenter_img The researchers, Mohamed Y. Zakaria, Mohammad Y. Al-Haik, and Muhammad R. Hajj from the Center for Energy Harvesting Materials and Systems at Virginia Tech, have published a paper on the new energy-harvesting method in a recent issue of Applied Physics Letters.”The greatest significance of the work is the reduction of the volume of the harvester, which translates to an increase in the power density, by eliminating the need for a secondary structure to be attached to the beam,” Zakaria said. “This reduction is important in the design of very small harvesters that can be used to develop self-powered sensors.”The research shows that subjecting a flexible beam to wind at the right angle of attack can cause the beam to bend so much that the beam’s “flutter speed” is significantly reduced. A large degree of bending also induces a change in the beam’s natural frequencies that basically results in a synchronization of the beam’s bending and twisting frequencies. Specifically, the beam’s second bending frequency and torsional frequency coalesce, resulting in “self-induced flutter” of the beam. Complex aerodynamic effects ensure that the vibrations are self-sustaining, allowing for continuous energy harvesting.The researchers demonstrated the design using a flexible cantilever beam with a piezoelectric transducer, which they hung from the ceiling in a wind tunnel. They found that the amount of energy harvested depends on a combination of factors, including the wind speed and the angle at which the wind hits the beam. At a wind speed of 10 m/s and 5.4° angle, the method can harvest approximately 0.3 mW of power. Although the researchers plan to improve the power levels, even this small value can be used to power individual sensors, which, as Zakaria explained, have a wide variety of applications.”Future monitoring of different systems and platforms such as air and water systems, structures, vehicles, infrastructure, etc., as well as secure data transmission and reception from these sensors, will require the use of hundreds or thousands of sensors, data loggers and hardware components,” Zakaria said. “The ability to integrate energy harvesters within these sensors or data loggers to develop such self-powered instruments is very much needed to enable their use without the need to replace batteries on a regular basis.”In the future, the researchers plan to design even smaller beams with specific geometries and capabilities, as well as to improve the performance of the piezoelectric elements. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org)—In an attempt to harvest the kinetic energy of airflow, researchers have demonstrated the ability to harvest energy directly from the vibrations of a flexible, piezoelectric beam placed in a wind tunnel. While the general approach to harvesting energy from these “aeroelastic” vibrations is to attach the beam to a secondary vibrating structure, such as a wing section, the new design eliminates the need for the secondary vibrating structure because the beam is designed so that it produces self-induced and self-sustaining vibrations. As a result, the new system can be made very small, which increases its efficiency and makes it more practical for applications, such as self-powered sensors. Explore furtherlast_img read more